Equestrian Issue

Rock Fall Near Owens Peak

By: Ben Barry
July 8th, 2019

Earthquakes in July have caused significant rockfall, primarily between miles 659-661, but also in other nearby areas. Route finding may be challenging with numerous scree fields and large boulders obscuring the trail. Be prepared to scramble through these sections and be aware that more earthquakes are expected in this area.

Blowdown in Grider Creek area

By: Stephanie
June 19th, 2019

For those behind me, I hope this might benefit them. There must have been a storm or a landslide in the tick-infested area just south of the road walk in Seiad Valley. There are more fallen logs than I have seen in 1,000 miles of trail, as well as huge overgrowth of bushes, where one cannot see the trail. The main bulk of the obstacles is between Grider Creek Campground and 4 miles south of the last Grider Creek bridge going up the mountain. I send this message in hopes that volunteer crews can help out before even more hikers struggle through.

Glacier Peak Wilderness Largely Inaccessable to Stock

Sections:
By: Michael Hanley
March 4th, 2019

The Pacific Crest Trail in the Glacier Peak Wilderness is largely inaccessible to equestrian use due to significant numbers of large fallen logs.

The PCT between the junction of the North Fork Sauk Trail (approximately Halfmile 2502) and the Suiattle River Trail (approximately Halfmile 2540) is blocked by numerous down trees, washouts, and narrow sections of tread. Long distance riders are advised to trailer around these obstacles.

Logs some as large as 6 feet in diameter make the trail impassable to equine north of Sitkum Creek and on the climb up towards Vista Ridge (~2534). There are no convenient ways to get around these obstacles. The PCTA is working to reopen this area to equestrian users but it will not be accessible to stock in 2019.

Section K, WA, Steven’s Pass to Grizzly Peak. Smithbrook rd t.h.

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By: Cassie
February 4th, 2019

Equestrian:
4 significant trees down. First is right out of Smithbrook RD th, ~ 3’ diameter, no passage. Ride the road to the hairpin turn instead to join trail.

2nd tree: right before Janus. 3-4 ft diameter but easily navigated.

3rd tree: After lake Janus. Heading up slope to pass. Not as big as the first two, but too big for my single person saw, and more difficult to bypass.

4th tree: Right before grizzly Peak. It’s actually one tree that split in half, and both halves are over the trail. Very tricky to get around. Needs a bigger cross cut then I have to get it out. It’s passable, but you better have a horse that trusts you, and steps where you tell it to.

Also, shortly after Smithbrooke joins the PCT north, the hundred foot of trail that goes across the avalanche chute is narrow and crumbling, watch the edge.

No snow as of August 1, 2018, and not much water except at Lakes and one or two stream crossings. Mostly dry.

Section D over Labor Day Weekend

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By: cb97123
September 20th, 2018

I hiked from Highway 58 (Willamette Pass) to Highway 138 (North Crater Trailhead) utilizing the OST alternate north of Windigo Pass. The trail is in excellent shape with only sporadic logs across the trail that are easy to step over or around, a couple may be issues for Equestrians between Windigo and Maidu. The OST alternate is well signed and easy to navigate, even though it looks challenging on the maps. Lakes are down across the region, but water is available at all lakes/ponds on the OST alternate and at Maidu Lake (which I think is a better/easier water source than Six Horse Spring).