Trail Maintenance Issue

PCT Access Trail Closure near Glacier

Sections:
By: Matthew Riggen, USFS, Darrington Ranger District, Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest
June 27th, 2016

Major access trail for ingress/egress to the PCT, the North Fork Sauk trail # 649, will be CLOSED between mile 5 at Mackinaw Shelter camp and the Junction with the Pacific Crest Trail beginning July 27, 2016. The trail will re-open the morning of August 4, 2016.
This closure is necessary for safety reasons. PCT trail work including the use of dynamite will be taking place.
Failure to obey these closures could result in serious injury and will cause significant delays in completion of the trail repairs.
Contact the Darrington Ranger District at 360-436-1155 for further information.

Oregon Section D –

Sections:
By: alex
June 27th, 2016

Recently did a section of PCT from Oregon Section D to E. June 10-20, 2016
From Miller Lake (Mile 1863) to Windigo Pass (1876) and then we followed the old Oregon Skyline Trail up until it connects back with PCT at Odell Lake (1905).

– Expect serious slow navigation with lots of downed trees that haven’t been cleared for the season yet. We were averaging only 1-1.5 miles per hour navigating up/under/around all the debris.
– Expect patches of snow up to 1′ in depth particularly south of Odell in shaded areas that also obscured the trail.
-From 1906-1920, the trails have been cleared, however we hit a small storm window which dumped 3+ inches of snow, where made for slow going and we weren’t prepared as our minimal mesh hiking shoes and lack of winter gloves made for cold+wet conditions. Weather cleared up by June 20, but we were on a schedule and had to stop the section thru hike.

Heavy blow down and deadfall

Sections:
By: Twenty Winks
June 13th, 2016

About the first 10 miles between Klum Landing, mile 1747.9 and Dead Indian Memorial road, mile 1759.1 there are too many down trees to count and very slow going. Many bib trees have so many branches it’s hard to climb over them.
This section would be impossible for horses. Also heavy deadfall between mile 1764 and Fish Lake at Highway 140, mile 1770.9.

Bucks Lake to Middle Fork Feather River bridge

By: David Greenleaf
May 27th, 2016

Did an overnight trip to the PCT bridge on the Middle Feather River, 5/11 – 5/12.

Trail Condition: Starting at Big Creek Rd the first few miles to Lookout Rock have moderate amounts of snow and a number of trees on the trail (8+), none are too bad to get over or around. Trail is well marked and easy to follow despite the snow. Large amounts of branches and debris on the trail.

From Lookout Rock down into the Middle Feather River Canyon the snow disappears. However the amount of trees on the trail and debris increases. The hiking is rough going due to the amount of stuff on the trail. Past the Bear Creek Bridge (in good condition, no issues) the trail goes along a super steep hillside and is covered in leaves, which can be very slippery, in sections the trail has eroded away and the leaves have accumulated enough to completely cover it, making it a bit sketchy to cross sections. Would be super scary with a horse due to the steepness of the slope the trail is on. In the last mile or so before the river, the trail is getting very overgrown.

The PCT bridge of the Middle Feather is in good condition, didn’t notice any problems with it. Camped at the nice sites just past the bridge on the North side of the river.

Insect Note: Below 6,000 – 5,500ft this section is absolutely infested with ticks. Due to the amount of debris on the trail and overgrown sections, the ticks were able to easily attach to me and my dog. Was stopping every 15 minutes or so to remove ticks, easily 50+ ticks taken off both of us while hiking and another 20 or so that I missed and removed at home.

Section “M” first 7 miles – UNSAFE

By: Sam Solace
May 17th, 2016

The initial switchback section is great, including across the middle to the post piles. However, beyond that gets dicey. Initially, you will find overgrowth within the rocks past the post pile, making a couple areas tricky as it is difficult to see where the outer edge is trail, a bush, or air. That is the minor issue.

The greater problem is the handful of rock slides (shale) that have blown out the trail on the upper switchbacks (Southwest facing). The first one I encountered was just a few feet of damage, and clearing was relatively easy to find foot holds. The others were worse, where the trail was effectively replaced (blown out) by the slide. One I cleared a bit, the other I had to create a few foot holds, wedge the trekking pole and jump! Any slip and it is 1,000 to 1,500 feet before you hit anything as you slide down to probably your final hiking memory!!

If anyone is planning to train in this area I suggest avoiding this section and using the Jeep trails (Sierra Buttes Rd, Butcher Ranch Rd, to Sierra Buttes Trail) to reach the PCT at the summit (roughly 7 miles in).